Beer Guide

Beer Guide

Talking about beer in general terms is risky because IPA-style beer is different from dark beer like day and night. The color, aroma, taste, food to which the beer goes, and even the subtleties of the drink vary depending on the type of beer. Understanding beer is a long and complicated process, but it is useful to know the basics for every beer lover to master some knowledge about this historical drink.

Ale Was the Beginning

Beer is characterized by an abundance of species and subspecies, but the whole beer can be broadly classified according to the methods of preparation. The origins of the first and oldest method of preparation can be found back to ancient times. However, the name of the ale and its wider distribution are associated with medieval England. In the Middle Ages, ale was divided into weaker and stronger. Weaker type was used by people of all social levels. The stronger beer was for sale, this business was mostly run by women who did not work in the fields and could spend more time brewing beer for their family needs and for sale. Ale has its own specific rules of preparation: fermentation is carried out at high temperatures, and yeast is fermented at the top of the tank. The fermentation process is shorter, as a result, this type of beer is richer, creamy in texture, and often has a slightly sweet aftertaste.

Porter

A beer that will never be confused with anything else as it is rich in black or brown color and has a strong texture is called porter. Coffee and chocolate flavors are most commonly found in this type of beer, but the sweet taste of many porter can be compared to caramel also. The gentle combination of flavor sweetness with hop bitterness is the reason why this beer attracts its fans. Although porter is already a heavy beer compared to most other types of beer, an even more intense beer called stout is derived from porter.

Lambic

Probably, this type of beer might be called the most unique one. Its name derives from the city of Lambico in Belgium, and the beer itself began to be produced in the Pajotenland region. The uniqueness of this Belgian beer lies in the fact that, unlike any other modern types of beer, it is not prepared with specially grown yeast or in any strictly supervised environment. The lambic beer is prepared with wild yeast and bacteria found in the Zenne Valley near Brussels. During the preparation process, the mixture is left for a while in an open space to allow local micro-organisms to breed. This process can only be done from October to May, because during other months of the year, unwanted bacteria can appear and ruin all the process. The uniqueness of the lambic is not limited to its preparation, the taste of this dry beer is sour, and the pungent aroma is often flavored with fruit notes. Many people compare this beer with the taste of cider or even wine.

Lambic
Lambic